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The White Hart, Sherington - pub details

White Hart

Address: 1 Gun Lane, Sherington, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, MK16 9PE [map] [gmap]

Tel: 0871 951 1000 (ref 24634) - calls cost 10p per minute plus network extras

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> Current user rating: 8.0/10 (rated by 8 users)
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other pubs nearby:

Chester Arms, Chicheley (0.9 miles), Bell and Bear, Emberton (1.7 miles)

user reviews of the White Hart, Sherington

please note - reviews on this site are purely the opinion of site visitors, so don't take them too seriously.

5 most recent reviews of 7 shown - see all reviews

We were fortunate enough to stumble across this place on a cross country round walk from Olney on a glorious bank holiday weekend - the pub's famed beer and sausage festival was taking place. The sausage element is perhaps overplayed as these are dispatched from a kebab van style vehicle and the choice is limited but Elgood's Cambridge ale and a Jennings offering on tap were great choices.
BoehmBawerk - 4 May 2015 20:26
This is a pleasant pub in an attractive village and is now the only one remaining nearby now that The Swan has been turned in to a private house. There is some outside seating in the courtyard at the front as well as an enclosed beer garden at the rear that had a hen wandering around in amongst the tables.

Inside it consists of three rooms, although these are just partitioned off from one another rather than being entirely separate. The main bar in the middle has a tiled floor and a stone chimney breast at one end complete with an oversized clock hung above it and a large cut-out of a cat sat in the hearth. A small snug to the right had a wood floor with a few chunky wooden tables, some exposed stone wall and a wood burning stove. The walls were white plasterwork with black wooden detailing. There was some blue bench seating in the bay window and a couple of old black and white photo’s on the walls.

To the left was a room more geared up for dining with whitewashed stone walls and a vaulted ceiling. Besides the aforementioned garden there was also a covered courtyard area complete with a plasma screen at one end. The barmaid was friendly and helpful, although the waitress who brought the food a little less so.

Food wise, the menu offered a good selection of pub grub dishes including Ham Egg & Chips, Fish & Chips and a Burger as well as a few more adventurous options with most of the main courses being somewhere around the £10 mark and a selection of tapas dishes. My Sea Bass Fillet on a bed of Thai noodles and vegetables was one of the more expensive options at £14.50 but was a pleasant enough dish. If I were being critical I’d say that it could perhaps have been both a little tastier and a more generous portion but nonetheless I would be happy to return and try something else.

Beers on tap were Spitfire, Potton’s Lion Pale Ale, Adnams Southwold and Hopping Mad Brainstorm. Ciders were Thatcher’s Gold and Weston’s Family Reserve which makes a change from the usual rubbish around these parts.
Blackthorn - 13 Aug 2013 22:25
This is a pleasant pub in an attractive village and is now the only one remaining nearby now that The Swan has been turned in to a private house. There is some outside seating in the courtyard at the front as well as an enclosed beer garden at the rear that had a hen wandering around in amongst the tables.

Inside it consists of three rooms, although these are just partitioned off from one another rather than being entirely separate. The main bar in the middle has a tiled floor and a stone chimney breast at one end complete with an oversized clock hung above it and a large cut-out of a cat sat in the hearth. A small snug to the right had a wood floor with a few chunky wooden tables, some exposed stone wall and a wood burning stove. The walls were white plasterwork with black wooden detailing. There was some blue bench seating in the bay window and a couple of old black and white photo’s on the walls.

To the left was a room more geared up for dining with whitewashed stone walls and a vaulted ceiling. Besides the aforementioned garden there was also a covered courtyard area complete with a plasma screen at one end. The barmaid was friendly and helpful, although the waitress who brought the food a little less so.

Food wise, the menu offered a good selection of pub grub dishes including Ham Egg & Chips, Fish & Chips and a Burger as well as a few more adventurous options with most of the main courses being somewhere around the £10 mark and a selection of tapas dishes. My Sea Bass Fillet on a bed of Thai noodles and vegetables was one of the more expensive options at £14.50 but was a pleasant enough dish. If I were being critical I’d say that it could perhaps have been both a little tastier and a more generous portion but nonetheless I would be happy to return and try something else.

Beers on tap were Spitfire, Potton’s Lion Pale Ale, Adnams Southwold and Hopping Mad Brainstorm. Ciders were Thatcher’s Gold and Weston’s Family Reserve which makes a change from the usual rubbish around these parts.
Blackthorn - 13 Aug 2013 22:25
Nice country pub with 3 small rooms. It doubles as a locals pub and a restaurant. Whilst it has been modernised a little, it still retains much of its charm. 5 ales were on - Wells Eagle IPA, Courage Directors, Youngs Bitter, Concrete Cow Pail Ale & Concrete Cow Bulldozer. Cider was Thatchers Gold, with Katy & Cox's available in bottles. A good example of how to keep a country pub with the times, whilst maintaining character.
blue_scrumpy - 24 Oct 2011 22:00
As a regular, if less frequent than I'd like, drinker there for many years I agree with these reviews. The ale range is constantly refreshed - five decent ales normally available. The food is superb - best to book. But unlike some pubs the provision of excellent meals doesn't take over the place or detract from it as a place to enjoy a social drink. Landlord Keith is an affable institution and the village locals friendly. Nice to sit outside in the courtyard on a summer evening supping ale (good wine and tapas nibbles on offer too!)

Beer and Sausage Festival on the May Day Bank Holiday Weekend is an institution worth supporting. This pub has been local CAMRA Pub of the Year 2 years running in the past.

Can be hard to find from the village - best to get to it from the A509 up the hill from the Newport bypass, over the roundabout toward Olney, do a left (2nd Sherington signpost) and left again down Gun Lane.


BeerdieSteve - 12 Jun 2007 17:24

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